Historic plaques of Newcastle: map


Summary

See the photos as a slideshowhere
Nanjing Night Net

See the map here

Wayne Mullen with the memorial to Morris Light at Newcastle City Hall. Mr Mullen has documented 80 plaques around Newcastle for an interactive map./

Anglican building, The Abbey. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Adolphe, 1804. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

35th Infantry Battalion WWI battles. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Anne Feneley plaque.Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Bank of NSW. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

City Hall administration centre.

Baptist Tabernacle stone. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Commissariat store. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

City Hall foundation stone. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Contribution of industries to war. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Convict barrack.

First hotel in Newcastle – Ship Inn. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

First private colliery. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Engineers’ plaque. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Gantry crane. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Foundation Stone, Newcastle Methodist Central Mission. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Gardiner memorial pavillion. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

General cargo wharf. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Gardiner memorial pavillion. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Goods shed. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Henry Detlev Hingst

HMAS Maitland. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Honeysuckle workshops. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Joy Cummings memorial. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Lee wharf. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Kanichi Nakayasu memorial. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Lifeboat service. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Legacy 50th anniversary. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Lillie Wood memorial chair. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

The Longworth donation. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Memorial to Merchantile Marines. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Military Barracks. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Mitchell Park memorial gates, Merewether. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Morris Light, City Hall. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

National service and combined forces memorial. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

National service and combined forces memorial. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Nesca House. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

New erecting shop. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Newcastle RSL Club. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Nobbys Surf pavillion. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Newcastle war memorial Cultural Centre. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Northumberland County Council.

Ocean Baths opening. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Old Courthouse column. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Opening of Newcastle Art Gallery. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Order of Oddfellows. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Opening of the Union Bank. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Packet Steamer Wharf. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Perway Store. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Presbyterian Memorial. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Rededicaction of war memorial, Civic Park. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Road alignment post. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Royal Newcastle Hospital foundation stone. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Shortland centenary fountain. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Shortland fountain. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Shortland fountain. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Lieutenant Shortland’s landing place.

South Newcastle beach improvements. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

St Johns Church Cooks Hill fence dedicated on Temple Day. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Stockton memorial Vietnam. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Stockton memorial Korea. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Stockton memorial Malaya. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Stockton memorial WWII. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Subalterns Barracks. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Stockton memorial WWII. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

The Store Co-op. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Torpedo mine. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Tree planted by rotary founder Paul Harris. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Tribute from the Graduate Nurses of Royal Newcastle Hospital. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Vietnam memorial Civic Park.Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Vietnam memorial Civic Park. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

War memorial cultural centre. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Warrren Chipchase. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Watt Street. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Wendouree. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Wesley Fellowship House. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

William Dobell. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

WWI Roll of Honour. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

ARCHAEOLOGIST Wayne Mullen has documented 80 plaques in Newcastle CBD and counting as he attempts the first known recording of these historical treasures.

Mr Mullen has been uploading images and mapping the locations of the plaques, some dating back to the early 1800s, on flickr南京夜网.

‘‘Newcastle is the second oldest city in Australia so it does have a depth of history,’’ Mr Mullen said.

‘‘There’s this habit of installing plaques, I haven’t quite got a handle on. The reason I started taking pictures of the plaques is because they were essentially everywhere.’’

Based at The University of Sydney in NSW, Mr Mullen began his discovery of what he describes as Newcastle’s ‘‘forgotten treasures’’ in December 2011.

He purchased a weekender property in the CBD in 2008 and was amazed to discover how many plaques he would come across during his Saturday walks.

‘‘There are these little markers of history everywhere but what I found odd was the lack of awareness that they existed,’’ he said.

‘‘There’s been generation after generation of plaques but no generalised map.’’

The plaques include the site of the 1820 convict barracks in Watt Street and a Pacific Park tribute to former matron of Newcastle Hospital Irene Hall, who served from 1915 to 1958.

The site of Newcastle’s first wharf (1804) on the foreshore near Customs House has also been documented in metal as has the commemoration of former mayor Morris Light, situated at Newcastle City Hall.

Light, an alderman from 1902 to 1929 and mayor in 1924-25, is credited with being the moving force behind creating today’s civic centre.

He died of pneumonia in July 1929, five months before the new civic buildings, which included the town hall (renamed City Hall in 1981) and the Civic Theatre, opened.

University of Newcastle archivist Gionni DiGravio said he did not know of any official documents recording the CBD plaques.

But he said many had been highlighted on heritage walks conducted by Newcastle historical groups.

‘‘We do seem to create a lot of plaques in Newcastle,’’ he said.

He said the plaques tended to commemorate one of four things – the position of ancient buildings, war memorials, important people and early settlement sites.

A Newcastle City Council spokeswoman confirmed there was no general registry of plaques but there was information on 21 commemorative plaques in and around Newcastle that related to World War II.

The World War II plaques were placed at different locations by the Newcastle Australia Remembers Committee in 1995 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the end of World War II.


See the photos as a slideshowhere
Nanjing Night Net

See the map here

Wayne Mullen with the memorial to Morris Light at Newcastle City Hall. Mr Mullen has documented 80 plaques around Newcastle for an interactive map./

Anglican building, The Abbey. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Adolphe, 1804. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

35th Infantry Battalion WWI battles. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Anne Feneley plaque.Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Bank of NSW. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

City Hall administration centre.

Baptist Tabernacle stone. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Commissariat store. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

City Hall foundation stone. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Contribution of industries to war. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Convict barrack.

First hotel in Newcastle – Ship Inn. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

First private colliery. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Engineers’ plaque. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Gantry crane. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Foundation Stone, Newcastle Methodist Central Mission. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Gardiner memorial pavillion. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

General cargo wharf. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Gardiner memorial pavillion. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Goods shed. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Henry Detlev Hingst

HMAS Maitland. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Honeysuckle workshops. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Joy Cummings memorial. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Lee wharf. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Kanichi Nakayasu memorial. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Lifeboat service. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Legacy 50th anniversary. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Lillie Wood memorial chair. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

The Longworth donation. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Memorial to Merchantile Marines. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Military Barracks. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Mitchell Park memorial gates, Merewether. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Morris Light, City Hall. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

National service and combined forces memorial. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

National service and combined forces memorial. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Nesca House. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

New erecting shop. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Newcastle RSL Club. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Nobbys Surf pavillion. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Newcastle war memorial Cultural Centre. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Northumberland County Council.

Ocean Baths opening. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Old Courthouse column. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Opening of Newcastle Art Gallery. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Order of Oddfellows. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Opening of the Union Bank. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Packet Steamer Wharf. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Perway Store. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Presbyterian Memorial. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Rededicaction of war memorial, Civic Park. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Road alignment post. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Royal Newcastle Hospital foundation stone. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Shortland centenary fountain. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Shortland fountain. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Shortland fountain. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Lieutenant Shortland’s landing place.

South Newcastle beach improvements. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

St Johns Church Cooks Hill fence dedicated on Temple Day. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Stockton memorial Vietnam. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Stockton memorial Korea. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Stockton memorial Malaya. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Stockton memorial WWII. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Subalterns Barracks. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Stockton memorial WWII. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

The Store Co-op. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Torpedo mine. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Tree planted by rotary founder Paul Harris. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Tribute from the Graduate Nurses of Royal Newcastle Hospital. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Vietnam memorial Civic Park.Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Vietnam memorial Civic Park. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

War memorial cultural centre. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Warrren Chipchase. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Watt Street. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Wendouree. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

Wesley Fellowship House. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

William Dobell. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

WWI Roll of Honour. Picture: Wayne Mullen.

ARCHAEOLOGIST Wayne Mullen has documented 80 plaques in Newcastle CBD and counting as he attempts the first known recording of these historical treasures.

Mr Mullen has been uploading images and mapping the locations of the plaques, some dating back to the early 1800s, on flickr南京夜网.

‘‘Newcastle is the second oldest city in Australia so it does have a depth of history,’’ Mr Mullen said.

‘‘There’s this habit of installing plaques, I haven’t quite got a handle on. The reason I started taking pictures of the plaques is because they were essentially everywhere.’’

Based at The University of Sydney in NSW, Mr Mullen began his discovery of what he describes as Newcastle’s ‘‘forgotten treasures’’ in December 2011.

He purchased a weekender property in the CBD in 2008 and was amazed to discover how many plaques he would come across during his Saturday walks.

‘‘There are these little markers of history everywhere but what I found odd was the lack of awareness that they existed,’’ he said.

‘‘There’s been generation after generation of plaques but no generalised map.’’

The plaques include the site of the 1820 convict barracks in Watt Street and a Pacific Park tribute to former matron of Newcastle Hospital Irene Hall, who served from 1915 to 1958.

The site of Newcastle’s first wharf (1804) on the foreshore near Customs House has also been documented in metal as has the commemoration of former mayor Morris Light, situated at Newcastle City Hall.

Light, an alderman from 1902 to 1929 and mayor in 1924-25, is credited with being the moving force behind creating today’s civic centre.

He died of pneumonia in July 1929, five months before the new civic buildings, which included the town hall (renamed City Hall in 1981) and the Civic Theatre, opened.

University of Newcastle archivist Gionni DiGravio said he did not know of any official documents recording the CBD plaques.

But he said many had been highlighted on heritage walks conducted by Newcastle historical groups.

‘‘We do seem to create a lot of plaques in Newcastle,’’ he said.

He said the plaques tended to commemorate one of four things – the position of ancient buildings, war memorials, important people and early settlement sites.

A Newcastle City Council spokeswoman confirmed there was no general registry of plaques but there was information on 21 commemorative plaques in and around Newcastle that related to World War II.

The World War II plaques were placed at different locations by the Newcastle Australia Remembers Committee in 1995 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the end of World War II.