A new way to boost books


Summary

THESE days it’s not enough to write a book and hope it sells. In the fast-moving world of the internet and instant popularity, you have to push the right buttons to gain attention.
Nanjing Night Net

Just ask Rob Towner, a 30-year-old children’s book writer from Merewether.

Towner, who manages the website of national retailer Inspirations Paint from their Warners Bay head office, has this month launched his sixth children’s book, Animal Friends: Floating Orange Cubes.

He is hoping to generate interest in the book by offering it free in EPUB, PDF and MOBI files this weekend on Amazon’s website. To get the files, interested people need to share the book with friends on Facebook or Twitter.

He’s also chasing positive reviews via Little Book Owl on the YouTube internet channel and entering the book in award competitions.

‘‘This is going to be the big one,’’ he says. ‘‘I’m hoping to push it into the charts for free Amazon downloads. And people look at the charts.’’

The 13,000-word book, aimed at children ages 8 and over, includes illustrations done specifically for the book by students at St Dominic’s Centre for Hearing Impaired Children at Mayfield. The illustrations also come with the electronic versions of the book.

According to Towner’s Facebook page, the story is about a young girl questioning her father’s obsession with stockpiling fly spray, and his reply. The father explains ‘‘the completely true story of Patrick the Cicada, an insect living in 1956 who (with the help of plenty of other animal friends) stands up to the biggest bully in the backyard, a parakeet named Leslie’’.

The students at St Dominic’s were given single-sentence briefs on each illustration that was needed, encouraged to make them as colourful as possible.

He is negotiating distribution of the hard-copy edition of the book.

Despite his persistent effort (he began writing the book in 2009 and has rewritten it several times), the final result is not about the money.

‘‘This is a labour of love,’’ Towner says. ‘‘I’ve poured a lot of money into it already.’’

At full retail price of $16.95, Towner would make $4 per book. But he readily admits he’s looking to the future.

‘‘You can get it free [this weekend] just by tweeting about it. That’s worth $16.95 to me.

‘‘I’ve got a knowledge bank of sequels. The Outer Space Oyster is the next one. I’m building an audience.’’

The Amazon download page of Animal Friends: Floating Orange Cubes ishttp://bit.ly/robtowner


THESE days it’s not enough to write a book and hope it sells. In the fast-moving world of the internet and instant popularity, you have to push the right buttons to gain attention.
Nanjing Night Net

Just ask Rob Towner, a 30-year-old children’s book writer from Merewether.

Towner, who manages the website of national retailer Inspirations Paint from their Warners Bay head office, has this month launched his sixth children’s book, Animal Friends: Floating Orange Cubes.

He is hoping to generate interest in the book by offering it free in EPUB, PDF and MOBI files this weekend on Amazon’s website. To get the files, interested people need to share the book with friends on Facebook or Twitter.

He’s also chasing positive reviews via Little Book Owl on the YouTube internet channel and entering the book in award competitions.

‘‘This is going to be the big one,’’ he says. ‘‘I’m hoping to push it into the charts for free Amazon downloads. And people look at the charts.’’

The 13,000-word book, aimed at children ages 8 and over, includes illustrations done specifically for the book by students at St Dominic’s Centre for Hearing Impaired Children at Mayfield. The illustrations also come with the electronic versions of the book.

According to Towner’s Facebook page, the story is about a young girl questioning her father’s obsession with stockpiling fly spray, and his reply. The father explains ‘‘the completely true story of Patrick the Cicada, an insect living in 1956 who (with the help of plenty of other animal friends) stands up to the biggest bully in the backyard, a parakeet named Leslie’’.

The students at St Dominic’s were given single-sentence briefs on each illustration that was needed, encouraged to make them as colourful as possible.

He is negotiating distribution of the hard-copy edition of the book.

Despite his persistent effort (he began writing the book in 2009 and has rewritten it several times), the final result is not about the money.

‘‘This is a labour of love,’’ Towner says. ‘‘I’ve poured a lot of money into it already.’’

At full retail price of $16.95, Towner would make $4 per book. But he readily admits he’s looking to the future.

‘‘You can get it free [this weekend] just by tweeting about it. That’s worth $16.95 to me.

‘‘I’ve got a knowledge bank of sequels. The Outer Space Oyster is the next one. I’m building an audience.’’

The Amazon download page of Animal Friends: Floating Orange Cubes ishttp://bit.ly/robtowner