Western front: premiers faceshowdown in the trenches


Summary

1. How will the game be played?
Nanjing Night Net

Those wanting to watch a fast, free-flowing game might have a better chance of finding it on the Iron Chef because this match will be a grim struggle. The Swans of 2013 are no ugly ducklings but any team coached by Ross Lyon will always prefer to engage in hand-to-hand combat rather than a shootout. The Swans have an unshakeable belief in their contested style of football but so, too, do the Dockers so don’t expect either coach to be changing their plan so deep into the season. There will be plenty of ball-ups and tackles, and goals will be at a premium.

2. Why has Sydney coach John Longmire opted for speed?

The Swans know Josh Kennedy, Ryan O’Keefe, Kieren Jack and Jarrad McVeigh can match the Dockers for hardness but it’s the blistering pace of Lewis Jetta, Gary Rohan and Harry Cunningham which provides Longmire with a point of difference. The Dockers are brilliant at closing down space on the opposition but you can’t tackle what you can’t catch. The Swans will look to take every opportunity to feed the ball out to the trio in a bid to exploit the Dockers for pace. One of the three is likely to start in the red vest.

3. What impact will Kurt Tippett’s absence have on the Swans?

The Swans will miss Tippett’s scoring power but the flipside is they are less predictable with him injured. There is likely to be extra pressure on Jesse White to provide a target but he will get assistance from Mike Pyke and Shane Mumford when they are resting from the ruck. The Swans are at their best when midfielders such as McVeigh, Jack, Kennedy, Dan Hannebery, Ben McGlynn and Luke Parker run hard into attack to kick goals. It will test their endurance but it could be a case of no pain, no gain for the Swans.

4. How do Sydney quell Aaron Sandilands’ influence?

At 211cm and 120kg, Sandilands is too tall to reach over and too big to push out of the way but Pyke and Mumford have the athleticism to test him in general play. Mumford’s strength is his ability to follow up his ruck work by throwing his weight around at ground level while Pyke has become an exceptionally strong mark. The Swans’ defence will need to be organised when Sandilands, who is likely to dominate the hitouts, pushes forward in order to avoid one-on-one marking contests.

5. Why can the Swans win?

They have the big-game experience, the hardened bodies to match the Dockers’ combative style and the big ground suits their speed and run. The Swans also relish the challenge of winning in Perth and seem to grow another leg when their credentials are questioned. The Dockers have never made a grand final in their 18-year existence so the weight of history could also hold them down. But there’s a huge factor in the Dockers’ favour – the week off. The Swans’ hard year could tell in the second half.

Prediction: Fremantle by 9 points.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.


1. How will the game be played?
苏州美甲美睫培训

Those wanting to watch a fast, free-flowing game might have a better chance of finding it on the Iron Chef because this match will be a grim struggle. The Swans of 2013 are no ugly ducklings but any team coached by Ross Lyon will always prefer to engage in hand-to-hand combat rather than a shootout. The Swans have an unshakeable belief in their contested style of football but so, too, do the Dockers so don’t expect either coach to be changing their plan so deep into the season. There will be plenty of ball-ups and tackles, and goals will be at a premium.

2. Why has Sydney coach John Longmire opted for speed?

The Swans know Josh Kennedy, Ryan O’Keefe, Kieren Jack and Jarrad McVeigh can match the Dockers for hardness but it’s the blistering pace of Lewis Jetta, Gary Rohan and Harry Cunningham which provides Longmire with a point of difference. The Dockers are brilliant at closing down space on the opposition but you can’t tackle what you can’t catch. The Swans will look to take every opportunity to feed the ball out to the trio in a bid to exploit the Dockers for pace. One of the three is likely to start in the red vest.

3. What impact will Kurt Tippett’s absence have on the Swans?

The Swans will miss Tippett’s scoring power but the flipside is they are less predictable with him injured. There is likely to be extra pressure on Jesse White to provide a target but he will get assistance from Mike Pyke and Shane Mumford when they are resting from the ruck. The Swans are at their best when midfielders such as McVeigh, Jack, Kennedy, Dan Hannebery, Ben McGlynn and Luke Parker run hard into attack to kick goals. It will test their endurance but it could be a case of no pain, no gain for the Swans.

4. How do Sydney quell Aaron Sandilands’ influence?

At 211cm and 120kg, Sandilands is too tall to reach over and too big to push out of the way but Pyke and Mumford have the athleticism to test him in general play. Mumford’s strength is his ability to follow up his ruck work by throwing his weight around at ground level while Pyke has become an exceptionally strong mark. The Swans’ defence will need to be organised when Sandilands, who is likely to dominate the hitouts, pushes forward in order to avoid one-on-one marking contests.

5. Why can the Swans win?

They have the big-game experience, the hardened bodies to match the Dockers’ combative style and the big ground suits their speed and run. The Swans also relish the challenge of winning in Perth and seem to grow another leg when their credentials are questioned. The Dockers have never made a grand final in their 18-year existence so the weight of history could also hold them down. But there’s a huge factor in the Dockers’ favour – the week off. The Swans’ hard year could tell in the second half.

Prediction: Fremantle by 9 points.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on 苏州美甲美睫培训.